Study: Presence of Certain Protein in Prostate Biopsies Suggests Increased Cancer Risk

Research from a study printed in the Journal of Clinical Oncology showed that the presence of a particular protein in biopsied prostate tissue substantially increases the likelihood that cancer will develop in that organ.

From Weill Cornell Medical College:

“Researchers at Weill Cornell Medical College are looking at specific changes within prostate cells, from an initial biopsy, to determine which men have a higher risk of prostate cancer development and need repeat biopsies or other types of monitoring. This study starts to fill in the picture for about 10 percent of prostate biopsies.

Investigators found that 53 percent of men whose prostate biopsies showed expression of ERG protein developed invasive prostate cancer, compared to 35 percent of men whose biopsies were ERG-negative. All of the biopsies were classified as having high-grade prostatic intraepithelial neoplasia (HGPIN), which are lesions that may or may not morph into cancer.”┬Ł

The ongoing research should help physicians to decide how closely to monitor men at risk for prostate cancer. To learn more about the study, click here.

This is not intended as medical advice to replace the expertise and judgment of your health care team. It is intended to help you and your family make informed decisions, together with your doctor.